Cannes 2019 Photo Shoot - Tribute to Classic Cinema

We were back in Cannes Film Festival! This year, we recreated the iconic scenes as a tribute to classic cinema. Set upon the theme Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow, a 1963 comedy anthology film by Italian director Vittorio De Sica, our story follows and captures moments of a day starting from the moment she wakes up.

In collaboration with fashion designer Danilo Forestieri, six photos were shot within a day, each with a reference to classic cinema.

1. Marilyn Monroe - In Bed with Marilyn

When Marilyn embraces a pillow, it is the incarnation of the sensuality that is offered to the photographer's lens. This meeting between two artists resembles the negative of a painting by Soulages: here, the black unfolds its multiple shades; the white does the same: whiteness of the sheets and the skin... Even the red of the lips softens to be nothing more than a memory of color. The icon of the 7ème art gives itself to the photographer as it was given in the cinema: without shame but with total innocence.

Reference image: With Marilyn: An Evening/1961 Photography by Douglas Kirkland

Reference image: With Marilyn: An Evening/1961 Photography by Douglas Kirkland

2. Sophia Loren - Ieri, oggi, domani (1963)

In 1963, Sophia Loren played no less than three roles in Ieri, oggi, domani, alongside Marcello Mastroianni. The actress then offered herself to the camera of Vittorio de Sica in an exotic dance scene that will mark the history of cinema. Thirty years later, she was invited to Robert Altmann's Prêt-à-porter, who revisited the scene with humor. This is Sophia's fifth time working with the director and she was at the peak of her career and beauty. Everything was graceful at home: from the tip of her toes to the tip of her fingers. She was the epitome of delicacy. The Festival was not wrong to award him the prize for female interpretation in 1961, for her role in La Ciociara, directed by Vittorio de Sica.

Reference image: Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow (1963)

Reference image: Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow (1963)

3. Gina Lollobrigida - Anna of Brooklyn (1958)

The cinema has always given significance to the female body. Many actresses have agreed to reveal themselves in front of the camera. Among them, there is Gina Lollobrigida. Her voluptuous body cracks the screen, especially in the famous Notre Dame de Paris (1956) by Jean Delannoy, in which she wears a red dress that wraps around her generous bust. But it was undeniably in Anna of Brooklyn (1958) by Vittorio de Sica and Carlo Lastricati that her exuberant chest and wasp waist were best enhanced, marking the memories of the image of a perfectly perfect body - curved.

Reference image: Anna of Brooklyn (1958)

Reference image: Anna of Brooklyn (1958)

4. Sue Lyon - Lolita (1962)

When the cinema flirts with scandal, it is often enough to mention a detail to remember a scene. A woman dressed in a bathrobe and lying in a languid pose: it is Lolita, incarnated on the screen by the young Sue Lyon, in 1962, under the direction of Stanley Kubrick. Lying on her side, she leans on an elbow; her legs slightly bent highlight the curve of her buttocks, hidden under the garment. This scene full of innuendo made all the more talk about her that it was played by a teenager. The character of Lolita has so struck the spirits that the name is still used today to designate a very young girl with provoking behaviour. 

Reference image: Lolita (1962)

Reference image: Lolita (1962)

5. Audrey Hepburn - Breakfast at Tiffany’s (1961)

The decorations in a film have a great importance because they contribute largely to enlighten the spectator on the atmosphere of the work. The cinema has staged many sofas, but there is one that almost inevitably arises in the minds of moviegoers: the famous sofa in Breakfast at Tiffany's . In the apartment of Audrey Hepburn, there is a sofa in the shape of a half-bath including faucets, and with cushions. This wacky piece of furniture would give the tone of Blake Edwards’ comedy, which had a great success when it was released in 1961 and is still the subject of many television reruns.

Reference image: Breakfast at Tiffany’s (1961)

Reference image: Breakfast at Tiffany’s (1961)

6. Madeleine / Judy - Vertigo (1958)

In cinema, the sensation of vertigo can be obtained in different ways. For example, a low angle shot may suffice, yet the imbalance is only in the eye of the person who is watching. 

Alfred Hitchcock has masterfully managed to express this sensation in several of his films, especially in Psycho (Psycho): by a simple technical trick, the fall of the detective, embodied by Martin Balsam, gives the viewer the impression of being himself falling. The effect is even more striking in another film by the master, with the evocative title: Vertigo, considered one of the greatest movies in the history of cinema. Thanks to an ingenious process, the steeple's staircase resurrects James Stewart's fear of emptiness and prevents him from rescuing Madeleine / Judy, the woman he loves, a double character interpreted by the incandescent blonde Kim Novak, who joined so the small group of blonde actresses that Hitchcock liked.

Reference image: Vertigo (1958)

Reference image: Vertigo (1958)

Watch the behind-the-scenes video below:

Credits:

Photographer: Moja
Dress: Danilo Forestieri 
Model: Ines Prieto
Styling: Danilo Forestieri, Andrea Lombardi
Assistant styling: Irene Franco
Make up & Hair: Elisa Rampi
Lingerie: Lorrive Montenapoleone
Retouching: Ead Gjergji
Shot text: Anne Calais